17 Civil Society Organisations Call for UNSC Action on Sudan Coup

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We, the undersigned Sudanese, African and International civil society organizations write to express our solidarity with the people of Sudan who, over the past several months, have been calling for a peaceful, democratic transition. This effort has been endangered by the 11 April military coup. Although recent statements from the military transitional council are encouraging, the Security Council must not forget that a military regime is still in power and must take action to ensure a speedy transition to civilian authority and to sustain democratic reform. As the Troika of the United States, United Kingdom and Norway said on 14 April, “To date, the legitimate change that the Sudanese people are demanding has not been achieved. It is vital that that the authorities listen to the calls from the Sudanese people.”

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African and Sudanese Civil Society Call for Strong Response to Coup in Sudan

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(12 April 2019) We, the undersigned Sudanese and African civil society organizations write with deep concern about the military takeover in Sudan on 11 April 2019. The Sudanese people’s quest for peace and democratic change has propelled country wide protests since December 2018, which developed on 6 April 2019 into massive protests including a sit-in at the military headquarters in Khartoum which continues to the present moment. Although the people of Sudan have been calling for an end to the regime of President Omar Al Bashir, this is not how they wanted it to happen. Over his 30 year tenure, President Bashir has overseen the waging of several wars that have primarily targeted civilians, severe repression of political opposition and civil society, shrinking of civil society space and the secession of South Sudan. The recent announcement of a military transitional council headed by Awad ibn Auf, the former vice president and minister of defense under Bashir’s regime, however, represents an attempt by the regime to ensure its survival by sacrificing Bashir. Their imposition of a two year transitional period headed by the military, dissolution of the national assembly, suspension of the 2005 Constitution and imposition of a state of emergency and lack of a plan for transition to civilian rule, however, indicate that they do not share the protester’s goal of a peaceful and democratic Sudan. As a result, protestors, including both civic and political forces, have remained in the streets calling for change and a civilian transitional government.

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Open letter from civil society to the international community on the current situation in Sudan

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(10 April 2019) What has happened in Sudan since 6 April can leave no doubt as to the seriousness of the Sudanese people to dismiss a regime that has remained in power for 30 years through its dependence on the tools of dictatorship, kleptocracy, patronage, fear and wide-scale human rights abuse. Citizens in the hundreds of thousands went to the streets across the country on the 6th of April; a sit-in around the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) and National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) headquarters in Khartoum continues with unprecedented numbers of protesters gathered as we write. Whole families have come, along with new social change movements, youth, women, traditional opposition groups, secularists, Islamists – all demanding change.

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13 Civil Society Organisations Call For Strong IGAD Response to Uprising in Sudan

(1 March 2019) We, the undersigned African civil society organisations, write to express our concern about the deteriorating situation in Sudan. Nationwide peaceful protests against 30 years of oppression and the present day economic crisis have been met with government-sponsored violence and a failure to engage substantively with any of the protests and demands of the protesters. In a worrying escalation this week, President Bashir declared a year-long state of emergency, dissolved both the federal and regional governments, and appointed members of the military and security forces to regional governorships. These actions suggest that the authorities are preparing the groundwork for greater repression and impunity: as protests continued this week, new arrests of political figures and journalists who criticised the emergency declaration only underline this concern. Yet despite all this, Sudanese civilians and activists continue to call for democracy, good governance and human rights, values which IGAD has committed to promote.

Sudan Doctor’s Syndicate: Violations Associated with the Announcement of the State of Emergency in Sudan

(27 February 2019) On the evening of Friday 22 February 2019, the Sudanese President Omer Al Bashir announced a year long state of emergency in the whole of the country, with immediate effect. In addition, Al Bashir dissolved the cabinet and appointed a new government, mostly comprised of military personnel. As expected, a swift new wave of violations ensued. 

The Sudanese Civil Society Organizations’ Network Abroad

(13 February 2019) The Sudanese civil society organizations’ network is formed outside the country to be a main affiliate and major supporter and player in civil society activities together with other civil organizations with the aim of addressing issues related to livelihood of the people of Sudan and their quality of life in an independent and unbiased way. 

35 African civil society organisations call for strong AU response to popular uprising in Sudan

(6 February 2019) We, the undersigned African civil society organisations, write with deep concern about the deterioration of the situation in Sudan. The combination of long term repression and economic mismanagement has led to an uprising in which the Sudanese people are calling out for democracy, good governance and human rights, in line with the values of the African Union.